Mrs Cheong Choon Beng nee Song Buay Neo

Mrs Cheong Choon Beng





In Loving Memory of
Mrs Cheong Choon Beng
Died on 11th December 1935
Age 50 years

Sons
Cheong Chee Hai
Cheong Chee Tong
Cheong Chee Lim
Cheong Chee Juay
Cheong Chee Soon
Cheong Chee Hock
Grandsons
Cheong Eng Chye
Cheong Eng Leong
Cheong Eng Hae
Cheong Eng Liong

Daughters

Cheong Swat Cheng nee Mrs Wee Mah Cheow
Cheong Swat Keng nee Mrs Tan Soon Whye
Cheong Swat Eng R Lee Pang Chuan
Misses Cheong Swat Chui (?)
Misses Cheong Swat Neo




From One Hundred Years’ History Of the Chinese in Singapore
By Song Ong Siang 

Cheong Choon Beng, who, by his winsome manners, was very popular with all commercial travellers. Mr Choon Beng was one of the original mem- bers of the Chinese Co SVI, and, in 1902, went to England as one of the Straits Coronation contingent, and made good use of his time there in visiting and making the acquaintance of the heads of the manufac- turing firms with which Yap Whatt & Co had business dealings. He died on the 25th March 1913, like his elder brother, from an apoplectic stroke. 



One Hundred Years’ History Of the Chinese in Singapore
By Song Ong Siang 

In this year (1893) a young enterprising Straits [278] Chinese, Cheong Choon Kim, established the firm of Yap Whatt & Co, in d’Almeida Street, which was the first Straits-born Chinese firm en- gaged in commission, import and export trade in the Colony.80 With the assistance of his younger brother, Cheong Choon Beng, the firm became well known as intermediary in business between the Chinese dealers and shopkeepers and the European manufacturers. In 1902 Mr Choon Kim visited China and opened a branch of his firm in Shang- hai. On his death in 1905 the business was continued by Mr Cheong

Cheong Choon Beng, who, by his winsome manners, was very popular with all commercial travellers. Mr Choon Beng was one of the original mem- bers of the Chinese Co SVI, and, in 1902, went to England as one of the Straits Coronation contingent, and made good use of his time there in visiting and making the acquaintance of the heads of the manufac- turing firms with which Yap Whatt & Co had business dealings. He died on the 25th March 1913, like his elder brother, from an apoplectic stroke.